2020 vision will be needed for the next election

Republicans+vs+Democrats%3A+There+is+becoming+less+and+less+of+a+common+ground+between+the+two+parties.+Decades+ago%2C+the+parties+were+much+more+open-minded+when+negotiating.+%22People+have+become+so+sensitive+and+close-minded%2C%22+stated+Lexi+Rogers+%2811%29.+
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2020 vision will be needed for the next election

Republicans vs Democrats: There is becoming less and less of a common ground between the two parties. Decades ago, the parties were much more open-minded when negotiating.

Republicans vs Democrats: There is becoming less and less of a common ground between the two parties. Decades ago, the parties were much more open-minded when negotiating. "People have become so sensitive and close-minded," stated Lexi Rogers (11).

Maus Bullhorst

Republicans vs Democrats: There is becoming less and less of a common ground between the two parties. Decades ago, the parties were much more open-minded when negotiating. "People have become so sensitive and close-minded," stated Lexi Rogers (11).

Maus Bullhorst

Maus Bullhorst

Republicans vs Democrats: There is becoming less and less of a common ground between the two parties. Decades ago, the parties were much more open-minded when negotiating. "People have become so sensitive and close-minded," stated Lexi Rogers (11).

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On Oct. 15, the fourth democratic debate was held in Westerville, Ohio, hosted by CNN and the New York Times. Joe Biden, Elizabeth Warren, Pete Buttigieg, Bernie Sanders, Cory Booker, Julian Castro, Kamala Harris, Amy Klobuchar, Beto O’ Rourke, Andrew Yang, Tom Steyer, and Tulsi Gabbard were among the twelve candidates present.

Each candidate had 75 seconds to answer questions directed at them, 45 seconds for rebuttals and 15 seconds for clarifications. Even with the time restrictions, most continued to finish their points regardless of the limits. 

They have all presented different agendas if they were to become President, though all democrats share similar main ideas. One topic that many democrats wish to change revolves around healthcare in America. Other ideas stem from climate change, equality, immigration and gun reform.

Many share similar thoughts generally speaking, however they do each have differences that set them apart from one another.

Current poll leaders Joe Biden, Elizabeth Warren and Bernie Sanders have distinct similarities, while also having noticeable differences. Biden has taken a more moderate approach to the Democratic party, while Warren and Sanders have been labeled as “socialists” by many.

“A vote for any Democrat in 2020 is a vote for the rise of radical socialism and the destruction of the American dream,” stated President Trump.

Warren and Sanders have heavily fought for their “Medicare for All” plan. Sanders wants to eliminate private health insurance, while Warren’s plan has been vague on how it will be executed. Sanders wrote the Medicare for All Act and has used that as a running ground during his campaign speeches.

Medicare is a national healthcare policy that some Democrats want to expand to all of America. It would make it so that healthcare would be low-cost to even free.

Ready, Set, Register! The process to register is super simple. Registration must be sent in at least 29 days before Nov 20. “The next election is so important for the younger voters,” stated junior Bella Love.

Biden is opposed to Medicare for all and would rather expand on the Affordable Care Act that former President Obama established. The former vice president would propose a Medicare buy-in plan.

Other issues like climate change, equality, minimum wage, immigration and gun reform were also some of the most heated and highly discussed topics during the debates.

“We are going to cancel all student debt in this country and we are going to do that by imposing a tax on Wall Street,” stated Senator Sanders.

This statement draws the attention of students, specifically those who plan on going to college, are in college, or are out of college with an immense debt. College is costly and a lot of students end up having a substantial debt after they are out of school.   Even though Sanders may impose this bill if he became President, it does not necessarily mean that the bill will pass. Every single bill that is put forth must go through a rigorous process and needs to be cleared by the House of Representatives and the Senate.

Many candidates are still hoping for their big moment in a debate. Representative Tulsi Gabbard is one of those individuals and had several attention grabbing moments on the stage. When responding to the question, “should age matter when choosing a President,” Gabbard took the moment to rephrase the question before answering it.

“Here is the real question I believe you should be asking. Who is fit to serve as our Commander in Chief?”

With over twelve candidates remaining in the race, the window will soon start to close for those who actually have a chance at becoming the nominee.

“Once we get to the New Hampshire and Iowa caucus, It’ll probably narrow down to just a couple of candidates,” stated Mr. Donald Falls, an economics teacher.

The time for breakout moments is dwindling down and the fifth debate will be held on Nov. 20 in Atlanta, Georgia. So far, only eight of the twelve candidates in the last debate have made the cut to join the stage.

The 2020 election holds some of the biggest decisions the country has made in decades. Future generations will be majorly impacted by the individual who takes office on Jan. 20, whether it be Donald Trump, or any of the democratic candidates.